Congratulations to our May 2015 Graduates!

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Congratulations to everyone who graduated this May 2015! We are proud of your hard work and wish you many years of success.

We our proud to announce that our recent graduates received offers and have started working at Bank of America, Genworth, SAS, BB&T, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Maxpoint, & Aohey, LLC.

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Re-cap IAQF’s “How I became a Quant” at NC State

On Friday evening, Nov 14th 2014, NC State’s Financial Math program and IAQF (International Association of Quantitative Finance) hosted the event “How I Became a Quant”. The panel included Financial Math alumni, Jared Bogacki with BB&T and Albert Hopping with SAS, as well as Altrius Capital Founder, Jim Russo and current student Jeff High with Captrust. They each took turns sharing their career path stories with the audience and answered questions about quantitative careers. Dr. Jeff Scroggs, Director of the Financial Math program, acted as the moderator for the event.

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To start, Jim Russo talked about his background and starting his company, Altrius Capital in 1997. He enjoys quantitative finance and visited investment firms to learn more about the field, which included networking with his best friend who got an MBA from Princeton and worked at Bernstein (Alliance Bernstein). This inspired him to open his own investment management and financial consulting business in New Bern, North Carolina. Altrius Capital also has an office in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina and is growing fast.

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Next, FM Alumnus, Albert Hopping shared his career path story. He got his Bachelors in Physics at NCSU and then worked in the energy industry as a Risk Analyst. Several years later, he enrolled in the Financial Math program at NCSU and learned more about quantitative analyzing. He found it be interesting and amazing. Thus, this led to his current role at SAS where he applies quantitative analysis to his daily work. You can read his personal interview here.

Jeff High is finishing up his Financial Math degree at NC State. He did his undergraduate studies in Finance and Financial Economics, and then got a job at Wells Fargo. In 2006, he noticed his job became more and more quantitative. During 2007 to 2009, he worked at another investment firm and managed a team in Valparaiso, Chile while supporting New York, London, and Hong Kong trading services. Due to the 2008 financial crisis, he came back to US and and started his Masters in Financial Math at NC State while working at other investment firms. He realized technology skills are very important, which he is enhancing through the Financial Math program.

Lastly, FM Alumnus, Jared Bogacki shared his career path and has worked at BB&T for more than 10 years. He is currently a manager about shared his expertise and advice to current students on getting a job in the field. Jared and Albert both emphasized the importance of communication as a top soft skill to sharpen as it is required to be successful in the industry.

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After they shared their stories, Dr. Scroggs asked them about careers and salaries in the Financial Math industry, and work and life balance. Mr. Hopping said there is a high correlation between working hard and receiving high rewards and benefits. Thus, the harder you work, the more you are rewarded. But that comes with longer hours and stress. Mr. Russo made the point that if you enjoy what you are doing, the long hours and hard work will pay off and the stress is worth it because you are doing something you value. Mr. Bogacki agreed and mentioned the importance of having passion in what you do. Being overly stressed and not enjoying your job is not ideal and students should choose a career path that closely aligns with their interests, talents and passion.

They also talked about specific courses and types of technical skills students need to gain to be successful. All panelists stressed to not only focus on academics but to enhance business and soft-skills such as communication, interpersonal and problem solving skills. Being able to clearly articulate ideas, processes and models to clients and business colleagues is very important. Mr. High gave personal examples of his own experiences to emphasize the importance of gaining and improving technical and soft skills as significant factors in succeeding with one's own career path.

The audience had an opportunity to ask several questions about interview tips, types of interview questions expected in interviews, and other tips to succeed in the Financial Math industry. Thank you Jim, Albert, Jeff and Jared! Everyone enjoyed hearing your career stories and expert advice. The evening ended with a reception held in SAS Hall.

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IAQF’s “How I became a Quant” comes to NC State!

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We are pleased to announce this event below:

Financial Engineers Give a Personal View of their Careers in Quantitative Finance

A Series of Panel Discussions For Students Interested in a Career in Quantitative Finance

How I Became a Quant: North Carolina State University's Financial Math Program

Friday, November 14
5:00pm Registration
5:30pm Program Begins
6:30pm Reception & Networking

North Carolina State University- SAS Hall
2311 Stinson Drive- Room 2203

Panelists:

Jared Bogacki- BB&T

Jeff Rockwell High- Captrust

Albert Hopping- SAS

James Russo- Altrius Capital

Moderator- Jeff Scroggs

Registration is Complimentary!
Please Click Here to Register

Financial Math Alumni Panel Discussion on Big Data, High Frequency Trading and more…

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(Above left to right- Jeff Scroggs, Jonathan Leonardelli, Jared Bogacki, Ryan Wesslen, Albert Hopping, Emmanuel Sanchez)

Jeff Scroggs, Director of the Financial Mathematics Program, conducted a panel of industry experts on trends in financial mathematics and quantitative risk.  Three of the practitioners,  Jared Bogacki (BB&T),  Jonathan Leonardelli (Financial Risk Group), and Emmanuel Sanchez (Allianz), were from the class of 2004 – the first class to graduate with a Masters of Financial Mathematics.  Two of the panelists,  Albert Hopping (SAS Institute, class of 2007) and Ryan Wesslen (Bank of America, class of 2009), were more recent graduates.

The panel offered the audience an opportunity to see what role quants play in optimal business practices.

All the panelists agreed that their Masters of Financial Mathematics from NC State opened opportunities for career advancement, ranging from a entry-level quant positions to promotions to lead quant.

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Jared Bogacki started with the topic of 'Big Data'.  'Big Data' is the use of data sets so large and complex that it has become difficult to process them using traditional tools or data processing applications.  It is currently a hot specialization for quants, and will likely remain a sector of the job market that is hungry for well-qualified people. 'Big Data' is a broad term that covers several topics including analytics used to glean market sentiment as well as some aspects of high frequency trading.

High-Frequency Trading (HFT) is algorithmic trading that uses algorithms to rapidly trade securities. The methods involve proprietary trading strategies carried out by computers to move in and out of positions in fractions of a second.  Of course, there are many different approaches to HFT that range from geometric observations (Golden Cross) to taking advantage of arbitrage opportunities across markets (e.g. New York vs London).  Albert Hopping was asked, “Do you think HFT is good or bad for markets?”  He pointed out that HFT is really a response to the way electronic trading in markets such as the New York Stock Exchange and Chicago Mercantile Exchange function are regulated.  HFT reduces friction by providing liquidity, but it can also cause flash crashes that force markets to temporarily halt trading.  There was consensus that such trading is impossible to control – regulations always lag advances in technology.

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Effective deployment of quantitative risk management is a challenge for all businesses, large and small. Jonathan Leonardelli led this discussion.  There are many aspects to risk management, ranging from data mining for parameter estimation to the creation of dashboards in the context of Enterprise Risk Management. The push to use more quantitative risk measures can come from inside the business or from outside.  For example, regulations like the Dodd-Frank act require more transparency from banks and reliable quantitative measures for stress testing.

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Emmanuel Sanchez was asked to lead the discussion on how weather-related risks can be controlled. Climate change has brought the spotlight on some of the impacts of short-term and long-term weather. Catastrophe bonds can provide protection against large-impact short-time events such as hurricanes and floods; whereas, weather insurance provides coverage based on measures such as annual rainfall and heating degree days (when it is cold enough to need a furnace).  The availability of these securities and derivatives allows the sharing of risk inherent in sectors like farming and homeowners insurance.

Ryan Wesslen was asked to share his favorite/best model in the area of consumer credit risk and/or counterpart credit risk.  Of course, quants do not share the best model to predict recent trends, but many share their wisdom in hindsight after a particular model offers no significant competitive advantage.  No model is likely to produce a clear crystal ball with excellent valuations, and all models provide some level of insight. For example an individual’s credit scores, like many holistic indicators, are good at the extreme high and low ends. But scores in the middle aren’t good predictors of default risk.

Thank you Jared, Albert, Jonathan, Emmanuel and Ryan!

Keep a lookout for an upcoming new blog series- interviews with a featured alumnus to learn even more about his or her experience and expertise.