“Meet our Financial Math Alumni Series”- Meet Sai Raman

"Go beyond the program!" -Sai Raman

Sai Raman graduated from the Financial Math Program in May 2015. He is currently working as Business Controller at Credit Suisse, in North Carolina. Sai did his Bachelors in Mathematics in India before completing his Masters in Financial Mathematics at NC State. Sai had the opportunity to do a summer internship at GE in Australia and was an active student participating in several musical events at NC State.

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Why did you decide to get a Master’s Degree in Financial Math program at NCSU?

Sai: I completed my Bachelors in Mathematics and was planning to further my studies. I felt a combination of Computer Science, Finance and Mathematics would be my area of interest. I did some research on graduate programs that combined those focuses and decided Financial Mathematics was the right direction to head in, and I liked NC State's program.

Did you do an internship while you were in the Financial Math program, and if so, please tell me about your internship experience?

Sai: Yes, I did an internship at GE (General Electric) in Australia. My internship work combined mathematics and statistics. I built metrics tool to calculate the online time delivery for GE equipment for an oil project. I used Data Manipulation techniques and Statistical analysis models to build a dashboard that could give desired output in 30 seconds.

It was a great learning experience to work for a big company like GE. The internship helped me to enhance my professional business skills such as improving my communicational skills. I am able to carry the knowledge and experience into my current role at Credit Suisse.

Can you explain more about your current job?

Sai: I work as a Business Controller at Credit Suisse. My job is focused on reviewing the P&L (Profit & Loss) after every trading day. Generally, for every single trading desk, there is a control team behind it and I belong to Emerging Market Group trading risk. We review the trades of the previous day, see the impact of P&L for every market move in the trade and calculate the risk based on the linear approximation for a portfolio and then compare to the actual P&L. Then we check how accurate our models are and see if any assumptions were
considered wrong. Then correct the wrong assumptions and re-do everything. Mostly MS-Excel is used for the calculations.

Sounds interesting, can you tell us a little more about your job at Credit Suisse?

Sai: The job is rewarding and challenging. The first two weeks we had a training program from all new employees of Credit Suisse from New York. However, the job forces us to continually learn daily with new challenges and situations to problem solve. Dealing with P&L of big amounts daily makes my work interesting. There will be days where we see millions of dollars missing in the accounts, few due to some technical reasons and few due to real market reasons. It is the Business Controller's role to come into the picture and resolve the issue. Sometimes the work becomes very hectic, especially the month end and first 10 days of the month. Work day can start in the morning 8.30 and end by 8.30 in the night. The rest of the month the work-load is normal.

Tell us about the interview experience with Credit Suisse?

Sai: The interview went quite smoothly. I attended an information session held by Credit Suisse in our one of the Friday Seminar classes, Later I went and spoke to the people and applied online for a few finance jobs. The following week, I got a call from Credit Suisse asking for my work interest and was invited for an on-site interview. There were two rounds of interviews, mostly testing my knowledge and experience from my resume.

In your opinion, what courses are more important and which concepts are more useful at your current place of work?

Sai: In my perspective, all the courses are equally important. Financial Mathematics and Computational Methods in Finance are the courses that I am currently applying at my job. I personally like these subjects very much and I have always paid special attention to those courses. I did a project on pricing barrier options using a single algorithm; that was a very good learning experience.
Solid understanding of Financial Mathematics (MA 547) helps a lot in the Computational Finance course (ECG 766).

What are the suggestions you want to give for the current and future students of Financial Math?

Sai: Go beyond the program. The program gives you the foundation and direction, but take it one step further. Take the FRM exams. Do projects. Apply for jobs with plenty of time and apply for many positions as the job market is very competitive. Network and get connected to Human Resources and recruiters through
LinkedIn.

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Thank you Sai!

“Meet our Financial Math Alumni Series”- Meet Yi Chao

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"Speak to people…Increase your network!"- Yi Chao, May 2015 Graduate

Yi Chao recently graduated from the Financial Math program in May 2015. She was an active student in our program as a Career Ambassador and Intern. While studying hard to be among the top of her class, she also took full advantage of all career development activities. Her hard work paid off as she received a full-time job opportunity to work at Maxpoint.

Yi Chao is currently working as a Product Analyst at Maxpoint in RTP (Research Triangle Park) in North Carolina. We are glad she took the time to share her experiences and advice to incoming, current and prospective students. Her interview below- by Preethi Kankanala

Why did you decide to get a Master’s Degree in Financial Math program at NCSU?

Yi Chao: I received a Bachelors in Applied Mathematics in China. While I was studying I always wanted to do something that can be applied to daily life situations. After taking courses Microeconomics, Econometrics and Game- Theory, I felt finance was the best direction for me to take as a career choice.

I was fascinated by real-time data, the movement of stock prices and how the daily market situations affect the price. With the Mathematics background I had, Financial Mathematics was the best field to choose.

How did the Financial Math program prepare you for your job?

Yi Chao: I took mostly statistic courses as I was interested in analyzing data. Also, I enhanced my programming skills after coming here. I did not have much programming experience before coming here, but after the Monte Carlo class, the assignments and projects in the course helped me improve my programming skills and I ended up with an A+ in that class.

Also it is very important to concentrate on all the courses equally, because you never know which one will help you more during the job search, so I put equal effort in all classes.

How was your experience with your summer internship at Altrius Capital?

Yi Chao: Working with Altrius Capital Investment company gave me a great hands-on experience on valuation and real world concepts behind trading. My project at Altrius included doing market research for a fixed income market trader. I used financial statements & balance sheets to analyze the different companies, and give suggestions to the trader.

The other project I worked on is more quantitative, using Morningstar software we transferred the data to excel and analyzed the data of public companies.

Can you explain more about your current job? And how is internship helping you for this job?

Yi Chao: I am now working in Maxpoint as a Product Analyst. My job mainly consists of market research, analyzing data, try to get insights from it and improve our product. My project is mostly done in Python. We use statistical models to analyze the data, find target users and serve advertisements.

From the surface, my present job and the internship projects seems to be different but at the core they are almost the same. The thinking method is similar by using quantitative methods to do research and solve problems.

Important to note, at work we give lot of presentations. My internship allowed me to enhance my soft skills and learn how to communicate better. I am now more confident in giving presentations in my current job.

What are the different position you have applied for the full time and how did you apply for those?

Yi Chao: I applied mostly for the Quantitative jobs, Risk Management and Data Analyst roles. Most of the jobs I have applied were through LinkedIn and Glassdoor. However, besides applying to jobs online, it is also very important to follow up with the application through the respective HR manager or with any alumni working in the same company (If there are any).

How did the career fairs help you?

Yi Chao: Career fairs gives you a lot information. You will get to know the companies and the different positions they offer. It is the best place to network and market yourself. Many job requirements ask for 3-5 years of experience in any of the programming languages, but if you show you have great analytical and problem solving skills and learn quickly, there is a chance they may hire you. It helps to be confident in the skills you have.

What are your suggestions for the current and future students?

Yi Chao: The main advice I would like to give to the students is, network with the people, do not let your fear or inhibitions to take a back step on this. There is never a harm if you speak to people, only good happens. Keeping aside about job, you will get to know lot of information from their experience. Also contact people through LinkedIn. I talked to lot of Financial Math Alumni and learned a lot from them. I also got a few interview calls because of my network.

Grasp every opportunity to talk to people, professors, alumni and people coming from industry. Keep looking for what you are interested in because that is what gives you the passion to learn or work. Push yourself to be the best you can and then you will know your potential.

Regarding jobs and internships, make sure you start applying as early as possible and make a very good resume, and be clear on each and everything that is written on your resume.

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Thank you Yi! We appreciate your time and advice.

Congratulations to our May 2015 Graduates!

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Congratulations to everyone who graduated this May 2015! We are proud of your hard work and wish you many years of success.

We our proud to announce that our recent graduates received offers and have started working at Bank of America, Genworth, SAS, BB&T, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Maxpoint, & Aohey, LLC.

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Re-cap IAQF’s “How I became a Quant” at NC State

On Friday evening, Nov 14th 2014, NC State’s Financial Math program and IAQF (International Association of Quantitative Finance) hosted the event “How I Became a Quant”. The panel included Financial Math alumni, Jared Bogacki with BB&T and Albert Hopping with SAS, as well as Altrius Capital Founder, Jim Russo and current student Jeff High with Captrust. They each took turns sharing their career path stories with the audience and answered questions about quantitative careers. Dr. Jeff Scroggs, Director of the Financial Math program, acted as the moderator for the event.

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To start, Jim Russo talked about his background and starting his company, Altrius Capital in 1997. He enjoys quantitative finance and visited investment firms to learn more about the field, which included networking with his best friend who got an MBA from Princeton and worked at Bernstein (Alliance Bernstein). This inspired him to open his own investment management and financial consulting business in New Bern, North Carolina. Altrius Capital also has an office in downtown Raleigh, North Carolina and is growing fast.

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Next, FM Alumnus, Albert Hopping shared his career path story. He got his Bachelors in Physics at NCSU and then worked in the energy industry as a Risk Analyst. Several years later, he enrolled in the Financial Math program at NCSU and learned more about quantitative analyzing. He found it be interesting and amazing. Thus, this led to his current role at SAS where he applies quantitative analysis to his daily work. You can read his personal interview here.

Jeff High is finishing up his Financial Math degree at NC State. He did his undergraduate studies in Finance and Financial Economics, and then got a job at Wells Fargo. In 2006, he noticed his job became more and more quantitative. During 2007 to 2009, he worked at another investment firm and managed a team in Valparaiso, Chile while supporting New York, London, and Hong Kong trading services. Due to the 2008 financial crisis, he came back to US and and started his Masters in Financial Math at NC State while working at other investment firms. He realized technology skills are very important, which he is enhancing through the Financial Math program.

Lastly, FM Alumnus, Jared Bogacki shared his career path and has worked at BB&T for more than 10 years. He is currently a manager about shared his expertise and advice to current students on getting a job in the field. Jared and Albert both emphasized the importance of communication as a top soft skill to sharpen as it is required to be successful in the industry.

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After they shared their stories, Dr. Scroggs asked them about careers and salaries in the Financial Math industry, and work and life balance. Mr. Hopping said there is a high correlation between working hard and receiving high rewards and benefits. Thus, the harder you work, the more you are rewarded. But that comes with longer hours and stress. Mr. Russo made the point that if you enjoy what you are doing, the long hours and hard work will pay off and the stress is worth it because you are doing something you value. Mr. Bogacki agreed and mentioned the importance of having passion in what you do. Being overly stressed and not enjoying your job is not ideal and students should choose a career path that closely aligns with their interests, talents and passion.

They also talked about specific courses and types of technical skills students need to gain to be successful. All panelists stressed to not only focus on academics but to enhance business and soft-skills such as communication, interpersonal and problem solving skills. Being able to clearly articulate ideas, processes and models to clients and business colleagues is very important. Mr. High gave personal examples of his own experiences to emphasize the importance of gaining and improving technical and soft skills as significant factors in succeeding with one's own career path.

The audience had an opportunity to ask several questions about interview tips, types of interview questions expected in interviews, and other tips to succeed in the Financial Math industry. Thank you Jim, Albert, Jeff and Jared! Everyone enjoyed hearing your career stories and expert advice. The evening ended with a reception held in SAS Hall.

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Meet our Financial Math Alumni- Brandon Blevins

Meet Brandon Blevins, Product Controller at Credit Suisse in New York City. Brandon graduated from the Financial Math program in 2009. We were glad to catch up with him in Manhattan and learn about his job and life in the city.

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Part I: Education & Job Background

1) How did the program prepare you for your job?

Brandon: The Financial Mathematics program gave me the background about quantitative finance. It provided me with the basics on how financial assets work, how models applied to assets, and how interest rate curves work.

2) Describe your job.

Brandon: Currently, my job is Product Controller at Credit Suisse. The main point of Product Control is to ensure that the Profit and Loss (PL) generated by portfolios reviewed gets to the general ledger of the bank, which then is reported to shareholders and board members who make financial decisions based on Credit Suisse earnings.

My day involves reviewing risks on books, making sure risks are within tolerances, and P/L are in line with the risks. For example, suppose you have net Vega on a single position of $100K. The volatility moved on the position by 100 basis points and you did not make or lose any money on that position. Did that make sense? It is the Product Controller’s job to make sure it does makes sense. If something is wrong, we flag it. We make comments on any big moves, big losses, and provide reasons why money is lost.

Part II: Analytic techniques

3) Does your company use stochastic models? If it does, what kind of models are used? Is there any reason for choosing these models?

Brandon: We use Black-Scholes formula to build up implied volatility curve. Options with the same underlyings and maturity but different strike prices have different implied volatility. The same options with different maturities may also have different implied volatility. Thus, implied volatility is a function of strike price and maturity, and we can define a volatility surface. We also use jump-diffusion models to model certain protocols. For example, is there a big court case coming up in the next few years for a specific company, or does this specific company have any big products coming out in a few years? That is where jump-diffusion comes into play.

Part III: Risk management

4) How does the crisis and the regulation policies enacted afterwards affect the behavior of your company?

Brandon: Radically. Since then, many parts of businesses have been shut down. Interest rate products have been drastically cut by 90%, because the Feds have kept rates low. There is a huge push to move everything onto exchange and standardize all products. Any flow business has been hit hard such as the credit default swap (CDS) market. Junk bond market has been on fire lately. But it did excite the mortgage back portion.

5) The goal of risk management is to achieve a balance between returns and risks. Thus, with lots of capitals and human resource spent, risk management may, to some extent, reduce a company’s profits. Now suppose you are a leader of a financial institution. Driven by the motivation of maximizing the profits, will you pay enough attention for risk management?

Brandon: Lead traders will listen to risk management and work in conjunction to set risk limits and VAR measures. If the limits get breached, everyone will look at it.

6) You used to be an interest rate derivative analyst, but now you are focusing on equity derivatives. So in your opinion, what is the difference between the interest rate derivative market and the equity derivative market?

Brandon: Interest rate market and equity derivative market start to look alike with low volatility. The bond market did very well in the past, but now it hover sideways because of the flat yield curve environment. Equity market is experiencing the same problem. Rates are not moving and are low.

Part IV: Suggestion & Advice

7) What skills set are important to succeed in your field? And what kind of courses will you recommend for current students to take.

Brandon: Networking! Make sure people like you, so they will recommend you. I landed all of my jobs because I knew people who worked for companies that I wanted to join as well. I got the interviews because people recommended me. Therefore, students should get out there, meet people, talk to them, learn from them, make relationship with them, and then they will recommend you for jobs. Just get connected! People can put you in positions to succeed, and give you opportunities to help you succeed. If they like you, they want to you succeed.

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Thank you Brandon!

Congratulations December 2014 Financial Math Graduates-100% placement!

Congratulations to our small, but successful December 2014 graduating class! These students hard work paid off as they enter the work world in January, 2015. Reshmi Paul will be working at T.Rowe Price, Changyi He will be working at Deloitte and Liye Wang will move back to Beijing, China to work for a commercial bank. We are proud of you and wish you all the best of luck!

Left to Right- Liye Wang, Leslie Bowman (Director of Career Services), Jeff Scroggs (Director), Changyi He. Not pictured- Reshmi Paul

Left to Right- Liye Wang, Leslie Bowman (Director of Career Services), Jeff Scroggs (Director), Changyi He. Not pictured- Reshmi Paul

"I enjoyed my time at NC State's Financial Math program. The people are nice and the program gave me a lot of opportunities to network with professionals, as well as learn practical knowledge on how to apply mathematics to the finance industry."- Changyi He

"The Financial Math program is excellent in combining financial knowledge, mathematics, and programming. It provides us the tools to help us be successful with our future professional careers."- Liye Wang

IAQF’s “How I became a Quant” comes to NC State!

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We are pleased to announce this event below:

Financial Engineers Give a Personal View of their Careers in Quantitative Finance

A Series of Panel Discussions For Students Interested in a Career in Quantitative Finance

How I Became a Quant: North Carolina State University's Financial Math Program

Friday, November 14
5:00pm Registration
5:30pm Program Begins
6:30pm Reception & Networking

North Carolina State University- SAS Hall
2311 Stinson Drive- Room 2203

Panelists:

Jared Bogacki- BB&T

Jeff Rockwell High- Captrust

Albert Hopping- SAS

James Russo- Altrius Capital

Moderator- Jeff Scroggs

Registration is Complimentary!
Please Click Here to Register